Your Height and Risk of Disease

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Height or stature could affect the risk of certain medical conditions, according to a new study.

For example, being tall is associated with a higher risk of atrial fibrillation or irregular heartbeat, but a lower risk of coronary heart disease, researchers at the Rocky Mountain VA Regional Medical Center in Aurora, Colo. reported.

Similarly, taller people have a higher risk of varicose veins but a lower risk of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

The researchers also concluded that tall people are more likely to develop leg and foot ulcers and peripheral neuropathy, nerve damage in the hands and feet that often includes a “tingling” sensation.

Some of these connections have already been identified in previous studies, e.g. B. A link between body size and an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Short people may also live longer than tall people, previous studies show

Your adult height may be a “non-modifiable” risk factor, but that doesn’t mean you can’t change other lifestyle factors that contribute to the likelihood or severity of a condition.

“Greater height increases the risk of developing back pain, and this could be due to excessive stretching of the spinal ligaments and significant pressure on the discs due to prolonged flaccidity,” explained specialist Dr. Medhat Mikhael. in Pain Management and Medical Director of the Non-Surgical Program at MemorialCare Spine Health Center at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California. “Tall patients are at much higher risk for blood clots and their potential complications.”

“People can’t choose their height, but a person’s weight is a modifiable risk factor,” Segil told Healthline. “Obesity, in both tall and short people, increases the risk of problems such as heart attacks, strokes and diabetes, and in general, being thinner reduces these risks.

“[But] most of these risk factors can be identified early, mitigated and potentially prevented,” Mikhael told Healthline.

Height or stature could affect the risk of certain medical conditions, according to a new study.

For example, being tall is associated with a higher risk of atrial fibrillation or irregular heartbeat, but a lower risk of coronary heart disease, researchers at the Rocky Mountain VA Regional Medical Center in Aurora, Colo. reported.

Similarly, taller people have a higher risk of varicose veins but a lower risk of high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

The researchers also concluded that tall people are more likely to develop leg and foot ulcers and peripheral neuropathy, nerve damage in the hands and feet that often includes a “tingling” sensation.

Some of these connections have already been identified in previous studies, e.g. B. A link between body size and an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Short people may also live longer than tall people, previous studies show

Your adult height may be a “non-modifiable” risk factor, but that doesn’t mean you can’t change other lifestyle factors that contribute to the likelihood or severity of a condition.

“Greater height increases the risk of developing back pain, and this could be due to excessive stretching of the spinal ligaments and significant pressure on the discs due to prolonged flaccidity,” explained specialist Dr. Medhat Mikhael. in Pain Management and Medical Director of the Non-Surgical Program at MemorialCare Spine Health Center at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California. “Tall patients are at much higher risk for blood clots and their potential complications.”

“People can’t choose their height, but a person’s weight is a modifiable risk factor,” Segil told Healthline. “Obesity, in both tall and short people, increases the risk of problems such as heart attacks, strokes and diabetes, and in general, being thinner reduces these risks.

“[But] most of these risk factors can be identified early, mitigated and potentially prevented,” Mikhael told Healthline.

reference – healthline.com

 

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